back to the Drawing Board. Again.

As the dust settles, while weekend warriors return to their respective humdrum existence, flashbacks of my little jungle escapade continued to haunt my waking moments. The aftermath were scratches and infected wounds that would probably take a week or two to fully heal. Those were only external, but could these flashbacks be tell tales of an impending aversion to jungle trail in time to come? I really don't know.

Traumatized yet intrigued by my own reaction/survival instincts, I have to say that the Hash experience was somewhat liberating in a masochistic kind of way. In the thick of it, I had resolved with little persuasion, that I would stick to just marathons. My comfort zone. A good friend Celene Loo's observation: "Trail runners are jungle warriors. BQ'ers are typical city clickers with short attention span..." couldn't have put it more succinctly. Well, what can I do? With such a short attention span, I'd  have to be more focused on the task at hand. In which case, the elusive ultimate goal of Sub 3. Of course, when I crave a little adventure or be it just to get away from the tyranny of training, I could always fall back on trail running...to reconnect with the joy of running, so to speak.

Now, it's back to the drawing board. Again. Almost 3 weeks of non training is quite enough. The body's already craving for some action. Yet, before I launch myself into another training frenzy, I should really look before I jump. I thought my last training before Osaka was methodical enough. But unfortunately, results don't lie. I have to devise a better plan.

From my split time in Osaka:

地点
タイム
ネットタイム
区間タイム
順位
 5km
00:23:27
00:22:02
0:22:02
1027
10km
00:43:41
00:42:16
0:20:14
724
15km
01:04:21
01:02:56
0:20:40
669
20km
01:25:15
01:23:50
0:20:54
594
中間
01:29:54
01:28:29
0:04:39
605
25km
01:46:00
01:44:35
0:16:06
551
30km
02:07:26
02:06:01
0:21:26
521
35km
02:30:04
02:28:39
0:22:38
504
40km
02:56:08
02:54:43
0:26:04
574
フィニッシュ
03:06:43
03:05:18
0:10:35
575


Up until 35.5km, I was well on track for sub 3, going at about 4:13 pace. It would have been swell if the marathon ends there. Nope. The eureka moment never came. No "Chariots of Fire" reverberating in the background. Superman has just been infused with IV Kryptonite. Yeah, I bonked big time. And the rest is history.

Sometimes, when you dismiss even a subtle sign or symptom, you do it at the peril of totally misdiagnosing the condition. The outcome could be disastrous. 85% of my training was done on the treadmill. And I was happily deluded that treadmill training was adequate to prepare me for that sub 3. And obliviously, I carried that delusion all the way to Osaka just to be rudely awaken and mercilessly hammered. The bruised ego would survive. But to crawl back into another gruelling training regime? That would take a whole lot more persuasion. Incidentally, the providential Hash experience was to be thanked, at least for helping me regroup.

At the risk of sounding a little conceited, it is considered prudent that if you are better at something, it would pay to continue honing it rather than starting something new which may only distract you. I am not saying I am remotely "good" at marathons, but at least, to compare that with, well, let's just say trail running, marathon is like a stroll in the park. And I am not even going to mention triathlon.

So, my deduction, since I am "running" out of time, and with an ultra short attention span, I'll stick to my marathon for now.

The plan: is to do the majority of the runs on the road. Sole emphasis is to clock actual OTR mileage. That would also require an all out marathon pace long run at least once a month. The body, particularly the legs, has to learn to adapt. You see, 42km on the road is very different from 42km on the treadmill. Am I stating the obvious here?

The same goes for tempo runs and interval training. Same plan. Just different venue. But one foreseeable problem would be the issue of time. For the past few months, I could easily hop on a treadmill, even while on call in the hospital and do my training. But with the new plan, the available time for training will be less flexible. And quite frankly, I am not an early morning guy. Waking at 4am to do long runs? Please. Weekends, maybe.

But it doesn't mean I'll say Adi'os to my beloved. I'll still visit. But less often. 

And when I do, it will be more intense.....

But in actual fact, the speed will have to be a notch higher to compensate for the actual "discounted" effort. And to make it more relevant, gradient would be better at 2-3%. 

GUYS, I am talking about the treadmill here.

All good to go. Now, just need to actually GO DO IT!!!

And another thing, it's never good to set yourself up with a rigid time frame when it comes to accomplishing something like sub 3. Unnecessary pressure. Take your time. It may not be soon. But keep at it. Who knows, you may surprise yourself one day when you least expect it.




Comments

  1. But you also have a number of ultras wor! Anyways, here's to you finding that balance between marathon speed and ultra speed!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jamie, am aware of that. Despite the ultras, the weekly mileage would probably not vary much. According to Relentless Forward Progress, what I am doing now (as long as I am maintaining 100+ km per week) I shd be alright.
      But, the focus isn't the ultra. Just aim to finish nia. (Extended LSD, so to speak)...:)

      Delete
  2. Hi Francis, try Pearl Hill. It's Kayvern's father (PB 2:38), my first mentor's training ground. He used to do 5 big loops (up to Casa Asrama). His LSD was run to work. :)

    ReplyDelete
  3. Sam, thanks. I have contemplated that too. Am also into Penang Hill now. Will be posting more on it later.

    ReplyDelete

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